Project #11: ESP32 Feather – ADXL335 – Mk08

ESP32 Feather – ADXL335

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ADXL335 Triple Axis Accelerometer

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ADXL335 Triple Axis Accelerometer

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ADXL335 Triple Axis Accelerometer

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ADXL335 Triple Axis Accelerometer

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ADXL335 Triple Axis Accelerometer

Breakout board for the 3 axis ADXL335 from Analog Devices. This is the latest in a long, proven line of analog sensors – the holy grail of accelerometers. The ADXL335 is a triple axis MEMS accelerometer with extremely low noise and power consumption – only 320uA! The sensor has a full sensing range of +/-3g.

DonLuc1909Mk05

1 x Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather
1 x Adafruit SHARP Memory Display
1 x Adafruit Adalogger FeatherWing – RTC + SD
1 x CR1220 12mm Lithium Battery
1 x 8Gb Micro SD Card
1 x RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor
1 x GPS Receiver GP-20U
1 x ADXL335 Triple Axis Accelerometer
1 x LED Green
1 x Rocker Switches
1 x 100 Ohm
1 x 10K Ohm
14 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
6 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
5 x Wire
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x Breadboard
1 x SparkFun Cerberus USB Cable

Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather

LG1 – Digital 21
RO1 – Digital 16
RHT – Digital 17
SCK – Digital 13
MOS – Digital 12
SSD – Digital 27
SDA – Digital 23
SCL – Digital 22
SD1 – Digital 33
SC2 – Digital 5
MO2 – Digital 18
MI2 – Digital 19
GPS – Digital 4
ACX – Analog A8
ACY – Analog A7
ACZ – Analog A6
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DL1909Mk05.ino

getADXL335.ino

getDisplay.ino

getEEPROM.ino

getGPS.ino

getRHT.ino

getRTCpcf8523.ino

getSD.ino

setup.ino

Follow Us

Web: http://www.donluc.com/
Web: http://neosteamlabs.com/
Web: http://www.jlpconsultants.com/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5eRjrGn1CqkkGfZy0jxEdA
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neosteam.labs.9/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/neosteamlabs/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/NeoSteamLabs/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/labs_steam
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/NeoSteamLabs

Don Luc

Project #11: ESP32 Feather – GPS Receiver – Mk07

ESP32 Feather – GPS Receiver

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Project #11: ESP32 Feather - GPS Receiver - Mk07

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Project #11: ESP32 Feather - GPS Receiver - Mk07

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Project #11: ESP32 Feather - GPS Receiver - Mk07

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Project #11: ESP32 Feather - GPS Receiver - Mk07

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Global Positioning System

The Global Positioning System (GPS), originally Navstar GPS, is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States Air Force. It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver anywhere on or near the Earth where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites. Obstacles such as mountains and buildings block the relatively weak GPS signals.

The GPS does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS positioning information. The GPS provides critical positioning capabilities to military, civil, and commercial users around the world. The United States government created the system, maintains it, and makes it freely accessible to anyone with a GPS receiver.

DonLuc1909Mk04

1 x Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather
1 x Adafruit SHARP Memory Display
1 x Adafruit Adalogger FeatherWing – RTC + SD
1 x CR1220 12mm Lithium Battery
1 x 8Gb Micro SD Card
1 x RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor
1 x GPS Receiver GP-20U7
1 x LED Green
1 x Rocker Switches
1 x 100 Ohm
1 x 10K Ohm
14 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
6 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x SparkFun Cerberus USB Cable

Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather

LG1 – Digital 21
RO1 – Digital 16
RHT – Digital 17
SCK – Digital 13
MOS – Digital 12
SSD – Digital 27
SDA – Digital 23
SCL – Digital 22
SD1 – Digital 33
SC2 – Digital 5
MO2 – Digital 18
MI2 – Digital 19
GPS – Digital 4
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DL1909Mk04.ino

getDisplay.ino

getEEPROM.ino

getGPS.ino

getRHT.ino

getRTCpcf8523.ino

getSD.ino

setup.ino

Follow Us

Web: http://www.donluc.com/
Web: http://neosteamlabs.com/
Web: http://www.jlpconsultants.com/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5eRjrGn1CqkkGfZy0jxEdA
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neosteam.labs.9/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/neosteamlabs/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/NeoSteamLabs/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/labs_steam
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/NeoSteamLabs

Don Luc

Project #11: ESP32 Feather – Rocker Switches – Mk06

ESP32 Feather – Rocker Switches

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ESP32 Feather - Rocker Switches

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ESP32 Feather - Rocker Switches

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ESP32 Feather - Rocker Switches

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ESP32 Feather - Rocker Switches

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Rocker Switch – Round

These panel-mounting rocker switches simple SPST on-off. They mount into a 20.2mm diameter hole and are rated up to 16A @ 12v.

DonLuc1909Mk03

1 x Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather
1 x Adafruit SHARP Memory Display
1 x Adafruit Adalogger FeatherWing – RTC + SD
1 x CR1220 12mm Lithium Battery
1 x 8Gb Micro SD Card
1 x RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor
1 x LED Green
1 x Rocker Switches
1 x 100 Ohm
1 x 10K Ohm
14 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
6 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x SparkFun Cerberus USB Cable

Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather

LG1 – Digital 21
RO1 – Digital 16
RHT – Digital 17
SCK – Digital 13
MOS – Digital 12
SSD – Digital 27
SDA – Digital 23
SCL – Digital 22
SD1 – Digital 33
SC2 – Digital 5
MO2 – Digital 18
MI2 – Digital 19
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DL1909Mk03.ino

getDisplay.ino

getEEPROM.ino

getRHT.ino

getRTCpcf8523.ino

getSD.ino

setup.ino

Follow Us

Web: http://www.donluc.com/
Web: http://neosteamlabs.com/
Web: http://www.jlpconsultants.com/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5eRjrGn1CqkkGfZy0jxEdA
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neosteam.labs.9/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/neosteamlabs/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/NeoSteamLabs/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/labs_steam
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/NeoSteamLabs

Don Luc

Project #11: ESP32 Feather – RHT03 – Mk04

Humidity and Temperature Sensor

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RHT03 - Humidity and Temperature Sensor

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RHT03 - Humidity and Temperature Sensor

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RHT03 - Humidity and Temperature Sensor

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RHT03 - Humidity and Temperature Sensor

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RHT03 – Humidity and Temperature Sensor

The RHT03 is a low cost humidity and temperature sensor with a single wire digital interface. The sensor is calibrated and doesn’t require extra components so you can get right to measuring relative humidity and temperature.

DonLuc1909Mk01

1 x Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather
1 x Adafruit SHARP Memory Display
1 x Adafruit DS3231 Precision RTC FeatherWing
1 x CR1220 12mm Lithium Battery
1 x RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor
1 x LED Green
1 x 100 Ohm
14 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
2 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x SparkFun Cerberus USB Cable

Adafruit HUZZAH32 ESP32 Feather

LG1 – Digital 21
RHT – Digital 17
SCK – Digital 13
MOS – Digital 12
SSD – Digital 27
SDA – Digital 23
SCL – Digital 22
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DL1909Mk01.ino

getDisplay.ino

getEEPROM.ino

getRHT.ino

getRTCDS3231.ino

setup.ino

Follow Us

Web: http://www.donluc.com/
Web: http://neosteamlabs.com/
Web: http://www.jlpconsultants.com/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5eRjrGn1CqkkGfZy0jxEdA
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neosteam.labs.9/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/neosteamlabs/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/NeoSteamLabs/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/labs_steam
Etsy: https://www.etsy.com/shop/NeoSteamLabs

Don Luc

Project #10: ESP8266 Thing – Precision RTC – Mk04

DS3231 Precision RTC FeatherWing

A Feather board without ambition is a Feather board without FeatherWings! This is the DS3231 Precision RTC FeatherWing: it adds an extremely accurate I2C-integrated Real Time Clock (RTC) with a Temperature Compensated Crystal Oscillator to any Feather main board. This RTC is the most precise you can get in a small, low power package. Most RTCs use an external 32kHz timing crystal that is used to keep time with low current draw.

With a CR1220 12mm lithium battery plugged into the top of the FeatherWing, you can get years of precision timekeeping, even when main power is lost. Great for datalogging and clocks, or anything where you need to really know the time.

DonLuc1901Mk03

1 x SparkFun ESP8266 Thing
1 x SparkFun FTDI Basic Breakout – 3.3V
1 x DS3231 Precision RTC FeatherWing
1 x RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor
6 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
3 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x SparkFun Cerberus USB Cable

SparkFun ESP8266 Thing

LG1 – Digital 5
RHT – Digital 4
SDA – Digital 2
SCL – Digital 14
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DonLuc1901Mk03p.ino

getRHT.ino

getRTCDS3231.ino

setWiFi.ino

setup.ino

Don Luc

Project #10: ESP8266 Thing – Web Server – Mk03

AP Web Server

Not only can the ESP8266 connect to a WiFi network and interact with the Internet, but it can also set up a network of its own, allowing other devices to connect directly to it. This example demonstrates how to turn the ESP8266 into an access point (AP), and serve up web pages to any connected client.

After uploading this sketch, find another device that you can connect to a WiFi network – phone, laptop, etc. Look for a network called “Thing-XXXX”, where XXXX is the last 2 bytes of the Thing’s MAC address.

WiFi => Yes

ESP8266 Thing XXXX

He sketch sets the network’s password to “donlucmk01”.

After connecting to your Thing’s AP network, load up a browser and point it to 192.168.4.1/read. The Thing should serve up a web page showing you its ADC and digital pin 12 readings:

Analog Pin = XXX
Digital Pin: XXX
Humidity and Temperature
Humidity: XX.XX%
Celsius: XX.XX*C
Fahrenheit: XX.XX*F

LED Green

After that, give 192.168.4.1/led/0 (No) and 192.168.4.1/led/1 (Yes) a try, and keep an eye on the Thing’s green LED while you do.

RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor

The RHT03 is a low cost humidity and temperature sensor with a single wire digital interface. The sensor is calibrated and doesn’t require extra components so you can get right to measuring relative humidity and temperature.

DonLuc1901Mk02

1 x SparkFun ESP8266 Thing
1 x SparkFun FTDI Basic Breakout – 3.3V
1 x RHT03 Humidity and Temperature Sensor
3 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x SparkFun Cerberus USB Cable

SparkFun ESP8266 Thing

LG1 – Digital 5
RHT – Digital 4
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DonLuc1901Mk02p.ino

getRHT.ino

setWiFi.ino

setup.ino

Don Luc

Project #10: ESP8266 Thing – Blink – Mk02

Soldering

Plated through-hole soldering (PTH), flux-core solder alloys commonly used for electrical soldering are 60/40 Sn-Pb used principally in electrical/electronic work and TENMA soldering station temperature controlled digital.

Hardware Assembly

We’re getting ahead of ourselves. To connect the FTDI programmer to your Thing you’ll need to solder something to the Thing. What, exactly, you solder to the board depends both on how you’ll use it in your project, and how you’ll interface it with the programmer. When it comes to selecting a header (or wire) to solder, there are a variety of options. We’ve tried a lot of them with the Thing:

Or you can mix and match headers to best fit your needs. Right-angle male headers may help to interface between the FTDI and the Thing. Straight male headers are a good choice for low-profile connections. Straight female headers may help with connecting to I2C sensors. And, of course, wire can be soldered to any of the pins that have a long way to connect to something.

10 pin – Break Away Headers – Straight
4 pin – Break Away Headers – Straight
6 pin – Break Away Male Headers – Right Angle

Once you’ve soldered up at least the programming port, you’re ready to load some code onto the Thing.

Programming the Thing

The ESP8266 has a built-in serial bootloader, which allows for easy programming and re-programming. You don’t need a specialized, expensive programmer – just a simple, USB-to-Serial converter. The FTDI Basic’s 6-pin header matches up exactly to the Thing’s 6-pin serial port header. To set up for programming, simply connect the FTDI directly to this port – take care to match up the DTR and GND pins.

Blink

Let’s blink some LEDs and IoT (Internet our Thing). To verify that everything works Blink: toggle pin 5, which is attached to the onboard LED Green, toggle pin 4 which is LED Green.

DonLuc1901Mk01

1 x SparkFun ESP8266 Thing
1 x SparkFun FTDI Basic Breakout – 3.3V
1 x LED Green
1 x 100 Ohm
4 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x USB Cable A to Mini-B

SparkFun ESP8266 Thing

LG1 – Digital 5
LG2 – Digital 4
GND – GND
VIN – +3.3V

DonLuc1901Mk01p.ino


setup.ino

Don Luc

Project #10: SparkFun ESP8266 Thing – Mk01

Description

The SparkFun ESP8266 Thing is a breakout and development board for the ESP8266 WiFi SoC – a leading platform for Internet of Things (IoT) or WiFi-related projects. The Thing is low-cost and easy to use, and Arduino IDE integration can be achieved in just a few steps. We’ve made the ESP8266 easy to use by breaking out all of the module’s pins, adding a LiPo charger, power supply, and all of the other supporting circuitry it requires.

Why the name? We lovingly call it the “Thing” due to it being the perfect foundation for your Internet of Things project. The Thing does everything from turning on an LED to posting data with datastream, and can be programmed just like any microcontroller. You can even program the Thing through the Arduino IDE by installing the ESP8266 Arduino addon.

The SparkFun ESP8266 Thing is a relatively simple board. The pins are broken out to two parallel, breadboard-compatible rows. USB and LiPo connectors at the top of the board provide power – controlled by the nearby ON/OFF switch. LEDs towards the inside of the board indicate power, charge, and status of the IC. The ESP8266’s maximum voltage is 3.6V, so the Thing has an onboard 3.3V regulator to deliver a safe, consistent voltage to the IC. That means the ESP8266’s I/O pins also run at 3.3V, you’ll need to level shift any 5V signals running into the IC. A 3.3V FTDI Basic is required to program the SparkFun ESP8266 Thing, but other serial converters with 3.3V I/O levels should work just fine as well. The converter does need a DTR line in addition to the RX and TX pins.

Features

  • All module pins broken out
  • On-board LiPo charger/power supply
  • 802.11 b/g/n
  • Wi-Fi Direct (P2P), soft-AP
  • Integrated TCP/IP protocol stack
  • Integrated TR switch, balun, LNA, power amplifier and matching network
  • Integrated PLLs, regulators, DCXO and power management units
  • Integrated low power 32-bit CPU could be used as application processor
  • +19.5dBm output power in 802.11b mode

Don Luc

Project #7: RGB LCD Shield – MCP4131 – Mk10

Microchip Technology Inc – MCP4131

Features:

-7-bit: 128 Resistors with 129 Taps to VSS and VDD
-SPI compatible interface
-Automatic Recall of Potentiometer Wiper Settings Resistance Values: 5k Ohm, 10k Ohm, 50k Ohm, 100k Ohm
-Absolute (Rheostat): <100 ppm (typ.) -Ratiometric (Potentiometer): <10 ppm (typ.) Device Overview – Summary

The MCP41/423X devices are volatile, 7-bit (129 wiper steps) digital potentiometers with an SPI compatible interface. The MCP41/42XX family is available with end-to-end resistor values of 5K Ohm, 10K Ohm, 50k Ohm and 100K Ohm. These devices offer a variety of configurations simplifying design while minimizing cost, package size and pin count.

Additional Features

-7-bit: 128 Resistors with 129 Taps to VSS and VDD
-SPI compatible interface
-Automatic Recall of Potentiometer Wiper Settings Resistance Values: 5k Ohm, 10k Ohm, 50k Ohm, 100k Ohm
-Low Tempco: Absolute (Rheostat): <100 ppm (typ.) -Ratiometric (Potentiometer): <10 ppm (typ.) -Low Wiper Resistance: 100 Ohm (typ.) -Low-Power Operation: 1µA Max Static Current -Wide Operating Voltage: 1.8V to 5.5V -Extended Temperature Range: -40°C to +125°C MCP4131 – Digital Potentiometer – 10K

Potentiometers are incredibly useful, whether you’re controlling the volume on your stereo or the ‘mood lighting’ in your room. The problem with traditional potentiometers is the fact that your microcontroller doesn’t have an easy way to interface with them. Digital potentiometers solve that problem by allowing you to control a voltage splitter with digital signals.

Wire it up just like a potentiometer and use serial signals to ‘turn the knob’. Another handy feature of digital potentiometers is that because they aren’t controlled mechanically, they don’t have a pre-determined sweep profile. In other words, depending on the way you write your code the potentiometer can ‘sweep’ in a linear fashion, a logarithmic fashion, or according to any other profile you like. Digital potentiometers can also be used in conjunction with rotary encoders to consolidate large banks of potentiometers into one ‘smart’ rotary control.

Digital Potentiometer MCP41131 and Arduino

We know the analog potentiometer, is a three-terminal resistor with a sliding contact that forms an adjustable voltage divider. Potentiometers many application such like:

1- Volume controls on audio equipment
2- Control the amplifier gain and offset
3- Transducer displacement transducers

Many other application, but did you want to control the resistance value by Arduino instead of using analog one. Analog potentiometers have some problem with Arduino doesn’t have an easy way to interface with them. The digital potentiometer, give you an ability to adjust the resistance, allowing you to control a voltage splitter with digital signals. This IC using SPI Protocol to communicate with Arduino.

DonLuc1808Mk03

1 x RGB LCD Shield 16×2 Character Display
1 x Arduino UNO – R3
1 x ProtoScrewShield
1 x MCP4131
1 x LED Green
1 x 270 Ohm Resistance
1 x NeoPixel Stick – 8 x 5050 RGB LED
1 x 100K Potentiometer
1 x Black Knob
7 x Jumper Wires 3″ M/M
12 x Jumper Wires 6″ M/M
1 x Full-Size Breadboard
1 x USB Cable A to B

Arduino UNO

MC1 – Digital 13
MC2 – Digital 11
MC3 – Digital 10
LR1 – Digital 3
POT – Analog 1
GND – GND
VIN – +5V

DonLuc1808Mk03p.ino

getMCP4131.ino

neopix.ino